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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
kinds of other things you know agriculture is important and you realize the opportunity for american agriculture. there's millions of people around the world emerge together the middle class. they buy more stuff including food and many countrys can not produce the food they want to consume. that's where american man a factoring has the on for an extraordinary american renaissance. how about free but fair trade? we need more markets to buy the stuff we need and sell and there's millions of people out there that can afford to buy it. now and of course i think we need to modernize our legal immigration system. this is the most generous country in the world with immigrants. one million people a year immigrate here. no other country comes close but the system needs to be modernized and take into account the opportunities for these and tourism as well. now that you have a middle class emerging from around the country can leave millions of dollars in places all across the country. we have a couple of places in central florida. few you may have heard of. one has a mouse. there's business exc
to a better night's sleep ♪ >> jon: beef is the biggest thing in american agriculture worth $44 billion a year. and industry experts say a small part of that market grass fed beef is getting a lot bigger. one beef producer says in the late 1990s there were about 100 grass fed farms. now there are about 2,000. it takes longer and therefore costs more to raise cows on grass but the farmers doing it say grass-fed is healthier for the cows. the environment, and the consumer. alicia acuna live in denver. some say it's better but not always that easy to find. >> right, john, because depending on where you live it can be a challenge. restaurants will carry it but markets will often sell out. so what a lot of families decide to do is go in with others. and what they do is buy a whole cow and then just fill up their freezer. we talked to david jessup who raises gas fed cattle in loveland, colorado. >> demand we found is just growing. we have doubled our production just in this past year. without really doing any advertising because people are finding out about this and wanting it and they are calling u
decades of the american agricultural economy, jefferson actually lost very little money on his farming operations, and so the slaves were really holding their own when commodity prices were plunging and so i mean jefferson just kept spending. the nail in the coffin financially was when he cosigned alone for his in law wilson kerry nicholas in the 1820s. nicholas was speculating in kentucky land acquisitions and he needed someone to cosign a 20,000-dollar note in the talk jefferson into it. six months later he went bankrupt and that is when the letters from monticello came. >> we have to circulate. >> all right. i want to follow up on the wheel because that is something i've been interested in on all the research i've done and of course after reading jan lewis's review yesterday where she called your book a train wreck i thought maybe you would like to use this to elaborate a little more on that and explain to the office that jefferson was made the exact terror and however, where i'm confused is that with 18 months of kosciusko's death of his will was contested by three different partie
of the worse decades of the american agricultural economy, jefferson actually lost very little money on his farming operations. and so, i mean, the slaves were holding their own when commodity prices were plunging, and so, i mean, and jefferson kept spending the nail in the coffin for him, financially, he cosigned a loan nubbing las. he was speculating in kentucky land accusations, and he needed someone to cosign a $20,000 note. he talked jefferson in to it. and six months later he went bankrupt. that's when the letters began to get -- [inaudible conversations] >> we --. >> wilson . >> i want to followup -- [inaudible] all right. i want to followup on the. i'm interested in that. after reading january lewis' review when where she called your book a train wreck. i thought maybe you wanted to use it to elaborate on it. explain something to the audience the executor and however where i'm confused, is that with 18 months of his death, this will was contested by three different party. two in europe one within in the united states at that time with the surfaced three different subsequent wills th
-- the slaves were not deliver a productive farmers and that in one of the worst decades of the american agricultural economy and, he lost very little money on his operations when the commodity prices were plunging and jefferson just kept sending debate to setting the nail in the coffin when he posted for his inlaw and 1820 he was speculating in kentucky land acquisitions she needed someone to cosign a 20,000 aware of and he talked jefferson into it and six months later he went bankrupt. and that is when the letters from monticello began to get looming. >> barry willson. >> i want to follow-up on the well because that is something i've been interested and of course after reading the review yesterday where she calls the book a train wreck i thought maybe you would want to use this to elaborate more on that. however, where i am confused is what 18 months of his staff though war was contested by three different parties and one of those in the united states at that time i don't quite understand and then jefferson predicted at this point he said this is going to really fall into a lot of liti
those cuban markets to american agriculture. in 2000, i offered an amendment to the treasury appropriations bill when i was in the house of representatives that removed those trade sanctions on food, agriculture, commodities and medicine. it paved the way for american farmers to sell their crops to cuba for the first time in more than 40 years. the language of that amendment ultimately became part of a legislation called the trade sanction reform and export enhancement act, tsrea. over the years, administrations have made changes that tightened the rules under that legislation and have made it again difficult for our farmers to sell agriculture commodities to cuba. on multiple occasions i've fought to reverse those decisions, those new rules by administrations to make it easier for us to sell those commodities. we're not even talking about trade. we're simply talking about the sale for cash of those commodities. we went through this -- in fact, last year i offered an amendment to an appropriation bill that was approved by the appropriations committee to change those regulatio
-585-3881. independents, 202-585-3882. again, for farmers and those in the agricultural world, 202-585- 3883. the american farmland trust gives us this breakdown of the 2010 usda farm bill spending, looking at what portions the spending goes to. food stamps were huge percentage american farmland trt . $62.9 billion. we get the commodities, conservation, crop insurance, energy, and exports. give us more insight into what the farm bill contains. guest: it is a massive piece of legislation that affects every aspect of american society, particularly rural america. it provides the most basic food assistance program in the country, food stamps, now officially called supplemental nutrition assistance program. then it also has a safety net for farmers in case of bad weather and low world prices. it also does things like bring the internet to rural america and promote by a diesel -- bio diesel and other bio-based products and fuels. since the farm bill expired on september 30, the agricultural department cannot do some of those things because it does not have the authority. host: why is the legislation being held
of american agriculture that we get this bill done by the end of the year. host: a tear from james in new york, republican caller. -- let's hear from james in new york, republican column. caller: i am a dairy farmer. it does not bother me too much that the farm bill has expired. people can talk all about entitlements. i do not believe that we need m ilc, milk income lost contact. right now we are at the mercy of big corporations and they set the tone for the price. we make 33 cents to 34 cents on a dollar that every consumer spends in a store, which, for production right now, it is not even close to that price. today there are less than 56,000 dairy farms. my own congressman said that immigration does not have an effect on that, but right now they're building -- bringing immigrants in and they're working full-time on these farms. the forms can get as big as they want, which forces the small people out. that is 170,000 farms with an average of three family members, over half a million jobs right there. i was wondering if you thought that john boehner, speaker boehner, would be willing to pass t
to a study from the u.s. department of agriculture one in five american children struggle with being hungry and sadly, there was very little mention of this by either side during the election. our next guest wants to change that. and there are solutions. billy shore is the founder of share our strength which is a group dedicated to ending childhood hunger. welcome inside "the war room." >> thanks. >> jennifer: first of all let's go to the scope of the problem. tell me about the scope. >> with 46 million americans living below the poverty line for the first time in history and 46 million americans on the food stamp program half being kids probably a bigger problem in terms of hunger and nutrition than we've faced in this country. we're in unchartered tear toe -- territory. >> jennifer: let's talk about it. what no hungry child -- >> no kid hungry. >> jennifer: sorry. no kid hungry is doing is an outreach program to the states to make sure that governors and then down to the cities and the school districts take adv
, pure and simple. it levels the playing field in russia for american energy, agriculture, manufacturing services, and our growing technology industry to be able to compete on a level playing field in that country with our competitors -- china, europe, brazil, and others. this bill means more sales, it's the ninth largest economy in the world. and more jobs here at home as a result of it. america gives up nothing in this legislation but it stands to gain much. trading that level playing field is important to job creation. but this bill also holds russia accountable to live up to its obligations, to play by the same trade rules everyone else in this world does as well. that means a chance to protect and means to insist that our intellectual property rights be protected. to insist that sound science be used and include safety. to insist again that there are not artificial barriers, either the front door or back, to american products and services being sold in russia. . this bill creates important new tools to continue to pressure russia to create progress on the important issue of human ri
of legislation that sets farm insurance policies, conserves, agricultural land and provides nutrition programs for millions of americans. you would think that something that affects the food supply and prices for every american would be a top priority for even the most dysfunctional lame duck congress in its last weeks yet it seems that a new bill may have to wait until early next year when the process will start all over. joining me now to tell us just how vital a farm bill is and why congress refuses to deal with it is a great friend, congressman peter welch democrat of vermont and a member of the house agriculture committee. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> eliot: what is the farm bill and why doesn't it fly through congress with almost unanimous support? >> there's two questions. the farm bill, every five years is reauthorized by congress. it has essential components for food stamps which feeds millions of americans in tough times. number two it has conservation programs which are so essential the reason of thi
of the viewers and most americans have no idea who henry wallace was. he has been wiped clean of the history books. henry wallace was the secretary of the agriculture in a 18 -- in the 1930's and roosevelt tapped him in 1940 and he wanted a progressive. in 1944, wallace had stood for a lot of progressive ideas. the united states has too dumb and intellectually, economically, militarily -- the united states has to dominate intellectually, economically and militarily. he called for ending imperialism commending colonialism, wiping of poverty, raising standards of living. in tradition of the french revolution, latin american revolution and the spanish revolution. he was the leading progressive and the second most popular man in america. on the eve of the democratic convention, the gallup did a poll. 65% of americans said they wanted henry wallace as vice- president. drew men who wanted wh were the party leaders. in the 1944 convention, after wallace makes is important speech, there is a great demonstration in favor of him. before he could get his name in the nomination, he would be back on that
is vital to the american economy. water, after all, is an essential ingredient in hundreds of thousands of everyday products. narrator: agriculture and industry use roughly 80% of the water consumed in the united states. water is the basis for manufacturing many goods and provides the ability to clean and sterilize everything from computer chips to the surgical instruments used in hospitals. kelly: the minute that there's not enough water for businesses, industry, and individuals, they have to go elsewhere. and when they go elsewhere, jobs go elsewhere. your entire economy begins to suffer with the lack of clean water. narrator: while the water infrastructure provides for our health, safety, and economy, a growing concern is that the value society derives from water has not traditionally been reflected in the price we pay for water. man: when you take a look at how much people pay for water, as a percentage of median household income, it's usually less than 1%. and when you compare that to how much we pay for electricity and gas, cable tv, and internet, the bottom line is, in the united
are approved. who does more for the american economy? major league baseball or the agriculture industry? that shows how broken our system is. we've got to make sure that we look, but there's so many jobs available. last as watching a program in which the skilled workforces is tremendous a combat pilot high skilled computers, just skilled labor is an issue. we need to look at our entire country, but having immigrants come to a country like dr. land said, is really is what a country is about and how it was found. this is a discussion we need to have, and look for. but currently right now, i've talked to many people come especially in georgia how cumbersome it is. and how it works. so we need to streamline that and make a more efficient. my personal opinion is i think the states can help a lot with that and cut the red tape of the federal government. >> can i just respond to the second one. it seems to me that the republican party is the party that is far more tolerant of the dissension than the democratic party us to our member bob casey not being allowed to speak, bob casey senior not be
of their visas are approved. who doesn't work for the american economy? baseball or the agricultural industry that shows how broken the system is back and we have to make sure there's so many jobs available last night i was watching the program in which the skilled work force i'm not talking about the software computers but skilled labor is an issue that we need to look at in the entire country but hit gets to the country like the doctor said is really what our country is about and how it was founded and this is a discussion that we need to have and look for but currently right now i would talk to many people were especially in georgia on how cumbersome it is and how it works, so we need to streamline that and make it more efficient so my opinion is i think the states can help a lot with that for the federal government. i remember bob casey not being allowed to speak at the democratic convention because he was pro-life. we have pro-life and pro-choice republicans. name me a pro-life democrat rather than bob casey, jr.. we have a pro-life pro traditional marriage republicans and we have homose
pass both sides of the aisle. >> agricultural spending. there's an acknowledgment of all the aspects in american economy. there are billions that could be saved there. by the way, it's a revenue issue, but it's treated as a spending issue. i get social security. i pay a tax on part of it. i think social security that goes to those of white house make more than $100,000 ought to be taxed at 90%. that's a way to raise revenue without harassing most people. i personally believe this commitment we have so send human beings to mars 10 or 15 years from now is something we can't afford right now. i'm in favor of space exploration being mostly done by instruments. you get the biggest bang for your buck. manned exploration to mars is hundreds of billions of dollars beyond what i think it is worth. elsewhere -- >> certainly not at this time, right, congressman? we're at the edge. >> you've got to start that down trend now. other areas i would like to see restraint, for example, more done in the areas of housing and more done in some of the other areas that i support. >> what would you do in ho
? teachers are going to get paid not to teach? that was the equivalent of the agricultural adjustment act so you know, without that we might have without the war. as i say roosevelt out of desperation turns really, unleashes american business and turns to free-market principles unless the americans more or less free. >> i am with the heritage foundation. as you know it's the primary text in some classrooms in america unfortunately. [inaudible] an audience of students who might have grown up on people's history, how do you introduce your work and your frame of reference to them who might have started with a different -- >> i do have a -- you need a history of united states but couple of years ago i did a book and it's a clever title but really what i did was i looked at the top 20 u.s. history textbooks. college textbooks, and what i found was that they all, almost without exclusion, share a certain similar falsehood like the rosenberg or sacco and vanzetti or one favorite one is transcontinental railroad never would have been built without government help and in fact, candidate or barack oba
. teachers will get paid not to teach the was the equivalent of the agricultural adjustment act. so without that, we might have been sunk without the war because as i said roosevelt really unleashes american business in terms of the free market principles and lets the american businessmen more or less free. >> as you know he is doing a primary text that you introduce your patronage to the united states to an audience of students who might have grown up on people's history. who do you introduce your work and free of reference to those that might have been presented were started with a different? >> i did have a top called questions and the patriots history of the united states but a couple years ago i did a book called 48 liberal allies of american history. it's a clever title but really what i did is looked the top 20 u.s. history textbooks college textbooks and what i found is that they all without exclusion share certain similar falsehoods like the rosenberg or one favorite one is transcontinental railroads. it never would have been built without government help, and in fact, the candidat
this year. the economic policy estimates more than 42 million americans will be on food stamps this thanksgiving. that equivalent to the combined populations of california and connecticut. the u.s. department of agricultural says the use of food stamps has increased 70% since 2007. >>> your time is 5:25. incredible story. a young basketball player a point guard for a small iowa university broke college basketball scoring record last night. his name is jack taylor his from grinnell college. would you believe he scored 138 points. he took 108 shots and he made almost half of them. taylor said it felt like well whatever he threw up was going in. just like that. in the division three game grinnell beat their interstate rival faith baptist church 179- 104. that is a high scoring game. the old record by the way was 113 points. and he's only this big. >>> time now 5:26. let's check on our wet commute. sal, that is incredible. >> it's not doing all that well. i apologize for not hearing you. the commute is very slow in many areas. let's start with the south bay. northbound 280 traffic
does more for the american economy? baseball or the agriculture industry. that their shows how broken our system is. we've got to make sure that -- are so many jobs available. last of us watching a program in which the skilled workforce instrument is the to him that time of high skilled software computer out of a skilled labor is an issue we need to look at, our entire coach but having immigrants come to our country like dr. land said, it's really is were country is about and how it was founded. this is a discussion we need to have and look for, but currently right now i've talked to many people, especially in georgia, how cumbersome it is. and how it works. we need to streamline that and make a more efficient to my personal opinion is i think states can help a lot with that and cut the red tape of the federal government. >> can i respond to the second one? it seems to me that the republican party is the party that is far more tolerant of dissension in the democratic party is. i remember bob casey not being allowed to speak them a bob casey senior not be allowed to speak at the democr
not to teach? that was the equivalent of the agricultural adjustment act. so, you know, without that we might have been sunk without the war. because as i say, roosevelt out of desperation turns really, unleashes american business, turns to free market principles and lets the american businessmen more or less free. >> do we have somebody over there? then one in the back. >> anthony koppel, heritage foundation. as you may know, howard zen's people's history is even a primary text in some classrooms in america, unfortunately. how do you introduce your patriot's history of the united states to an audience of students who might have grown up on people's history? how do you introduce your work and your frame of reference to them who might have been presented or started with a different frame of reference? >> well, um, i do have a talk called why students need a patriot's history of the united states, but a couple years ago i did a book called 48 liberal lies about american history. it's a clever title, but really what i did is look at the top 20 history textbooks, college textbooks, and what i fou
with the last farm bill. we are not where we need to be but agriculture is the shining industry creating jobs of revenue for american we need to support it not create a cloud of uncertainty over it. heitkamp: for the first time in decades, north dakota is a member of the united states congress has not been on the ag committee. another vote that congressman berg took was the vote for the ryan plan. signaled they could take $160 billion out of the farm program and take a 20% cut to crop insurance and that was okay with north dakota. in the senate passed the farm bill and a crossed over, the house had an opportunity to take that bill on. what happened is absolutely inexcusable. what happened is gridlock and that gridlock from a partisan stand point but gridlock in the republican party. gridlock that said we are not going to take the farm bill because we can't get consent because the far right of the caucuses you aren't going to get any crop insurance. we don't believe in crop insurance. we don't believe in the farm bill. you have to have someone who will stand strong for the farm bill. the congr
is w.h.o. has a 50% foreign-born, 100% of their visas are approved. who does more for the american economy? major league baseball or the agriculture industry? that there shows how broken our system is and we have to make sure that we look. there are so many jobs available. last night i was watching a program in which skill workforce tremendously -- i'm not talking about high school skills, but skilled labor. having immigrants is really what our country is about and founded. this is a discussion we need to have and look for. currently i have talked to many people, especially georgia, how cumbersome and how it works. we knee to streamline and make it more efficient. i think states can help a lot and cut the red tape for the federal government. >> i can respond to the second one. seems to me the republican party is the party that's for more tolerant of distention then the democratic party is. i remember bob casey not being allowed to speak. bob casey sr. not being allowed to speak at the democratic convention because he's pro-life. we have pro-life and pro-choice republican. name me a
more than 42 million americans will be on food stamps this thanksgiving. that's equivalent to the combined populations of california and connecticut. the u.s. department of agriculture says use of food stamps has increased 70% since 2007. >>> time now, just about 8:20. there's some encouraging news about a school in the east bay, a high school, where there are reports about weapons and drugs and alcohol use that dropped. >>> and it's a wet wednesday. steve paulson will tell us what kind of weather we can expect during tomorrow's thanksgiving holiday. >>> and good morning. highway 4, westbound. you can see it's a little bit different from a normal day. we'll tell you where the traffic trouble spots are for this wednesday's commute. +ulk >>> we have video of panicked hikers in new zealand running away as a nearby volcano erupts. this erupted earlier today for the second time in three months. you can see the black dust and smoke rising from the active volcano. scientists say the eruption was completely unexpected. but everyone got off the mountain safely. >>> some victims of h
a demand from both the military and the private sector to use american-made biofuels. in 2011, the navy, the department of energy, and the department of agriculture aimed to assist the development in support of sustainable commercial biofuels industry. they investigated the investment as alternatives to diesel and jet fuels. it included montana farmerring corporations, it would be detrimental to montana's alternative fuel industry. as a result, investing in biofuels, renewable crops have been used by military as the predominant feedstock for biofuel plants. i call these freedom fuels. why? because they help get us off the foreign oil and help bring good-paying jobs to montana. researchers at montana state university at vaver, montana, so camplinea is a promising proper kropf. also known as gold of pleasure is an oil seed crop that includes canola, mustard and broccoli. it's been grown in europe and the northern plains of the united states. since its initial production, the cost has dropped annually by half. every year it drops by 50%. another reason why i think it makes sense to ramp up
of woody guthrie, american radical. i asked him to talk more about guthrie's move east in 1940. will kaufman: he gets to new york. will geer is putting on aorganizing a concert, a benefit concert for the john steinbeck agricultural committee. amy goodman: which is what? will kaufman: the steinbeck committee to aid agricultural [organization] migrants, it was a benefitfundraising organization that was just raising money for the migrants, for the dust bowl migrants, out in california. steinbeck didn't have anything to do with it except lending his name, his name to it. amy goodman: of course, he wrote the grapes of wrath. will kaufman: and he wrote the grapes of wrath, of course, yeah, and became a friend of woody guthrie's there in california. so woody said, "yeah, of course i'll sign up to that." and so, will geer hasfor this new york concert, he has a roster of some of the top up- and-coming political folk singers there, also alan lomax, who's probably one of the most important figures there. he's the archivist of american folk song at the library of congress and also a musico
. the estimate raised to a rate of 2.7% and spending home sales jumped to a six year high. take agriculture i live look, the dow up 33, the nasdaq up 17 and s and p up five. >>> more good news, 393,000 americans filed claims for unemployment insurance last week. that's a drop of 23,000. in line with what economists had expected. applications spiked at 451,000 three weeks ago after hurricane sandy hit the east coast. >> palestine leaders brushing off the obama administration which wants them to call off a request for upgraded united nations recognition. allison burns in washington, to tell us why the secretary of state said this could hurt the chance of ever reaching peace with israel. >> reporter: her concern is that the vote would rise tensions with israel president palestine is likely to get their way. they see this upgraded status with the united nations would be a significant step toward independent statehood. this is video from palestine tv of rallies ahead of the united nations vote. after their failed bid last year today they are trying a different approach. they are asking for nonmem
as agriculture committee chairman and ranking member. we put american farmers and families first and politics last. my good friend from indiana and i were able to accomplish amazing things together. obviously, we had some differences of opinion as members of different regions and different parties do, but we knew we had to work together, and we did, and america benefit interested that. certainly our farmers did. the need to work together is just as true today, and it's going to take real leadership in the house and senate to pass a farm bill. now, we have seen on the leadership and bipartisanship here in the senate. having served as fairm for eight years of the senate agriculture committee, i can say without any doubt at all that chairwoman debbie stabenow has been one of the finest chairs we have had of that committee, and i have watched how hard she has worked, how hard the ranking republican pat roberts has worked. he has brought his tremendous experience and knowledge through his time as chairman of the house agriculture committee. in fact, mr. president, in the debate over that, and i co
of the farm bill. and we of the agricultural community talking about the 20%. and projected growth. 47.1 million americans on food stamps. massive increases under this administration. and they say we can only say the 4 billion in the senate bill. 4 billion? i was in the room with our present a bill strum different states -- with representatives from a different states. we have got to have those types of reforms, i plan on offering an amendment on the floor to start that process. if we are going to do with bill -- it would involveea -- this is what we need, we can do a better job. that should be part of the discussion. the idea, we can spend $80 billion a year and we do not want to reform that. the senate has made that clear. hopefully that will be a battle when we get to conference over what is in the bill, $800 billion for food stamps out of a trillion dollar farm bill. >> we have the state that have over the past several years been through referendums seeking to regulate the means of protection of our agricultural products. a state like california might say that estimate to californi
and restrict american access to russian markets. as a result studies show u.s. producers can expect to achieve double-digit increases over the next decade in exports of heavy machinery, agricultural machinery, chemicals, and services. this is particularly critical for my home state of illinois where we have fallen behind japan and korea in these export categories. most importantly, granting russia permanent normal trade relations gives the u.s. a level playing field on which we can compete from a position of strength in thames of intellectual property and agricultural exports. it will provide a reliable forum for trade dispute resolution. and i would urge my colleagues to vote for the rule and the bill to grow american exports and create good jobs here in the united states by supporting this rule and the underlying bill. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the -- the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: it's my pleasure to yield three minutes to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. fattah. the speaker pro tempore: g
and the reduced crop supply helped to drive up prices which has led the -- to subsidize agriculture. that in turn means the government has less food to donate to food banks. less than half in fact as we head into winter. reuters report that 50 million americans live on hunger or the edge of it. you should know the consequences of our actions, intended or otherwise are felt most acutely by those vulnerable to them. as washington debates the fiscal curve, you should know the spending cuts leveraged and traded in the abstract have no real implications in the -- federal unemployment set to expire. 2 million americans will lose unemployment insurance. republicans might have you believe that the whopping average of $291 a week keeps the unemployed from finding work. but you should know what the real impact of unemployment insurance has been. a new report for the unemployment project estimates that last year, unemployment insurance kept 2.3 million americans out of poverty including 620,000 children. when you think about fiscal cliffs, you should know there's none worse than the fall into poverty. >> yo
brought here as children or for the agricultural workers growing the food on our table, or for american families whose loved ones are stuck in decades-long green card backlogs. and so we are not fooled by the majority's assertion that this latest version of the bill actually helps families. in reality the provision that the majority touts is a step backwards from the act enacted under a republican congress in 2000. under that act undocumented spouses and children lawful permanent residents were able to obtain b visas and eventually adjust their status to flaul permanent residents. the bill offered such family members protection from removal and explicitly granted work authorization. in contrast, the provision that my colleagues herald this morning is helping families grant certain spouses and children who have already wait add broad -- waited abroad for over a year temporary b visas. there is no work authorization and undocumented family members would be excluded although -- all together from participating in this program. . so while the majority bill provides permanent green cards for
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)